Posted by & filed under Actively Engaged Workers, career development leadership development, Change Management, Communicating To Manage Performance, Leadership.

5 Ways To Become A Leader At WorkImagine a manager  (let’s call him Bob) coming out of the monthly performance review meeting, his head bowed. He had just been ‘shredded’ by his superiors. As soon as he got back to his office, he called his staff and shredded them with more venom. Fear gripped the whole office but at the end of the following month, targets were met. Our manager ‘Bob’ was commended. Would you say that Bob’s approach (including those who reviewed Bob) was effective?

One of the greatest challenges for leaders is how to communicate to motivate; to help people become the best they are capable of becoming. Understandably, the pressure to satisfy all stakeholders is immense. Most Boards and Shareholders are not interested in the challenges the CEO or senior management may be facing. “If competition can make that profit, then you can.” They invariably cascade the pressure. A number of CEOs may not bother to ask certain questions. Are our people developing the capacity to grow the company? What types of profits are they making and by what means? How sustainable is the performance using the means? What are the dangers of ‘financial engineering’ to declare shallow profits?  Are we building a company or an institution?

We have learned a few lessons we would like to share with you:

1. Understand You – Take a few minutes every day to think about how you view your job and relate to others. Are you operating ‘under fear’ and ‘with fear’? Do you lose control because of passion for results or fear of shredding? Do you see others as always difficult? Do you understand the individuals in your team? Are you the difficult one? Think of how you react or respond in different situations. Seek to be part of solutions to corporate challenges and not focus on a personal empire. Develop the part of you that brings out the best in others. Remember – in the moment of truth, you communicate the way you think.

2. Understand The Situation – Different organizations have unique challenges. You can’t use the same style in communicating to motivate. No one would expect the style in Apple to be similar to Microsoft or Google or Facebook. But the principles can be similar. Define and stick to the corporate values. Yours may be; respect without timidity, dignify without patronizing, care without manipulation, penalize without favor, and push for results with reward.
 
3. Understand Your Work Group – Your boss does not necessarily have all the answers or emotional maturity to handle all situations. He is human. Help him. Your employees may also have major periodic challenges that can affect performance. Help them. You also may need help! You don’t have to be an emotional Doctor but you need to apply emotional intelligence to know what to say and how to express yourself in different situations. People often respond to empathy rather than castigation, decisive action rather than a ‘longer rope’, praise rather than silence and correction rather than flattery.

4. Appreciate People And Results – Any asset you ‘depreciate’ cannot perform at optimal level. Even if you push it, in the medium to long term, the maintenance cost will be abnormally high. You need to use and maintain the asset, reasonably. There may be periodic need to stretch the asset and forget about other issues. Yes do it. People are the greatest assets. ‘Maintain’ their minds. Appreciate them and then focus their minds on results and not politics. They will appreciate your results.

5. Use Time To Build Minds – Most of us like to hear ourselves at meetings, conferences, performance review sessions and so on. We do not listen to what is said. We do not listen to what is not said. We do not ask for feedback. If we spend a few minutes to sincerely ask our colleagues for suggestions on how we and they can perform better to build more loyal customers, we will open the floodgates of trapped wisdom. Encourage them to come to meetings with ideas and not be note takers. People do not need to be afraid of you.

Leaders with the most impact are those who can build and successfully manage great teams. Every day, we help our clients and colleagues achieve their highest levels of professional presence and personal effectiveness. That includes everyone on the ladder, from company presidents to project managers, to staff members. Contact us at 800-282-3374 to find out how we can help you impact your own productivity and the productivity of your entire organization.

We deliver results-oriented training programs that increase productivity, effectiveness, & performance. Call 800.282.3374

 

Posted by & filed under Career Development, career development leadership development, Employee Development, Performance Management, Uncategorized.

3 Ways to Increase Trust in Your TeamProductive work relationships are based on trust.  An environment of trust carries with it an implicit message that you have each other’s best interests in mind, clearing the way for employees to accept criticism and even anger from their manager. They know deep down that the boss really means to help. Managers need to be proactive and create an environment of trust apparent to all, but how do we do that.

Ease up on Lecturing – To ensure that employees will make good decisions, managers often begin to lecture. If you reflect on this, you will soon realize that lecturing and telling your employees what to do implies that you do not have faith in their decision-making abilities. This can result in their becoming defensive. In addition, the employees can lose faith in their own confidence to make decisions. If people do not have faith in themselves, then the manager’s faith in them decreases even more and the lecturing begins again.

Listening to Learn – Listening to learn and valuing people’s feelings and ideas is what promotes the ability of managers to effectively communicate with and influence their staff. Listening to learn means not inserting your opinion and not judging what the person says while he or she is speaking. For most managers, their first reaction is to evaluate the employee from their own point of view and then approve or disapprove of what the person says. This is listening autobiographically. It shuts down the employee’s self-confidence, initiative and open communication. An easy strategy for replacing this tendency of listening autobiographically is to cultivate the habit of listening to learn.

A manager who listens well acknowledges employees’ feelings and opinions. A simple “Talk to me about it” is an effective start to dialogue. Just use the most effective sales principle: Inquiry precedes advocacy. In other words, listen before you talk. When you feel a temptation to interrupt, redirect that impulse by thinking of the following question: “Will I be more effective if I listen first?”

Working Smarter – Many people often say, “If I want something done right I have to do it myself.” Yet effective managers know that delegation of tasks is essential for building trust in the workplace. When you hold onto tasks and don’t delegate, you deprive your employees of an opportunity to advance their skills. Accept the fact that growth comes through struggle. Babying your employees hinders their professional development and implies that you don’t have faith in them. Focus on treating your staff as if they are who, how, and what you would like them to be. Treating people as if they are responsible and empowered increases their chances of becoming so.

Once the employee completes a task, the objective should be to focus on progress rather than on perfection. If the result does not meet your expectations, you can still find something positive to comment on while helping the employee understand what the initial expectations are. This is far more effective than comments that foster guilt or a sense of failure. A positive approach prompts an incentive for the task-in contrast to criticizing, which provides a disincentive.

Without trust in the workplace, communication and teamwork will erode. Additionally, morale will decrease while turnover will rise. However, by using these three strategies, you can build your employees’ trust in management, thereby making their workplace an environment filled with innovation, creativity and ultimately higher profits for all.

Leaders with the most impact are those who can build and successfully manage great teams. Every day, we help our clients and colleagues achieve their highest levels of professional presence and personal effectiveness. That includes everyone on the ladder, from company presidents to project managers, to staff members. Contact us at 800-282-3374 to find out how we can help you impact your own productivity and the productivity of your entire organization.

We deliver results-oriented training programs that increase productivity, effectiveness, & performance. Call 800.282.3374

Posted by & filed under Career Development, Employee Development, increasing personal effectiveness, Leadership.

3 Keys to Building Trust with Your Employees Any positive working relationship is based on trust. An environment of trust assumes that both parties will be safe, and it carries with it an implicit message that you have each others’ best interests in mind. That is why employees can accept criticism and even anger from a boss they trust. The employees know deep down that the boss really means to help. Managers need to be proactive and create an environment of trust apparent to all, but how do we do that.

Ease-up on Lecturing!

To ensure that employees will make good decisions, managers often begin to lecture. If you reflect on this, you will soon realize that lecturing and telling your employees what to do implies that you do not have faith in their decision-making abilities. This can result in their becoming defensive. In addition, the employees can lose faith in their own confidence to make decisions. If people do not have faith in themselves, then the manager’s faith in them decreases even more and the lecturing begins again.

Listen to Learn

Listening to learn and valuing people’s feelings and ideas is what promotes the ability of managers to effectively communicate with and influence their staff. Listening to learn means not inserting your opinion and not judging what the person says while he or she is speaking. For most managers, their first reaction is to evaluate the employee from their own point of view and then approve or disapprove of what the person says. This is listening autobiographically. It shuts down the employee’s self-confidence, initiative and open communication. An easy strategy for replacing this tendency of listening autobiographically is to cultivate the habit of listening to learn.

A manager who listens well acknowledges their employees’ feelings and opinions. A simple “Talk to me about it” is an effective start to dialogue. Just use the most effective sales principle: Inquiry precedes advocacy. In other words, listen before you talk. When you feel a temptation to interrupt, redirect that impulse by thinking of the following question: “Will I be more effective if I listen first?”

Work Smarter

Do you think that if you want something done right you have to do it yourself?  Effective managers know that delegation of tasks is essential for building trust in the workplace. When you hold onto tasks and don’t delegate, you deprive your employees of an opportunity to advance their skills. Accept the fact that growth comes through struggle. Babying your employees hinders their professional development and implies that you don’t have faith in them. Focus on treating your staff as if they are who, how, and what you would like them to be. Treating people as if they are responsible and empowered increases their chances of becoming so.

Once the employee completes a task, the objective should be to focus on progress rather than on perfection. If the person’s result does not meet your expectations, you can still find something positive to comment on while helping the employee understand what the initial expectations are. This is far more effective than comments that foster guilt or a sense of failure. A positive approach prompts an incentive for the task-in contrast to criticizing, which provides a disincentive.
The Bottom Line

Without trust in the workplace, communication and teamwork will erode. Additionally, morale will decrease while turnover will rise. However, by using these three strategies, you can build your employees’ trust in management, thereby making their workplace an environment filled with innovation, creativity and ultimately higher profits for all.

Leaders with the most impact are those who can build and successfully manage great teams. Every day, we help our clients and colleagues achieve their highest levels of professional presence and personal effectiveness. That includes everyone on the ladder, from company presidents to project managers, to staff members. Contact us at 800-282-3374 to find out how we can help you impact your own productivity and the productivity of your entire organization.

We deliver results-oriented training programs that increase productivity, effectiveness, & performance. Call 800.282.3374

Posted by & filed under Employee Development, Feedback, increasing personal effectiveness.

The Importance Of Successful Employee FeedbackA powerful transformation is underway. More successful small and mid-sized businesses are embracing “strategic HR” to drive higher performance, productivity and profits. But you probably know it hasn’t always been this way.

That was Then…

Historically, HR has not been viewed as a key businesses driver, unlike “vital” functions such as sales, marketing, or operations. It’s no wonder, then, that HR unfairly earned a reputation as a tactical back-office task, or worst case, completely unrelated to the overall health and success of the company.

And this is now!

Today, the role of HR has been radically redefined and more emphasis has been placed on effectively managing every aspect of the employee lifecycle, from talent acquisition, to performance measurement to employee compensation. This amazing shift in HR starts at the most fundamental level: helping raise the bar on individual performance not only helps employees realize their full potential, but also the company as a whole. In other words, strategic HR is ensuring that companies aren’t leaving huge amounts of money on the table in the form of missed profits due to unrealized performance and productivity.

1. Make sure employees’ daily efforts contribute to your company’s business objectives.
The first step in unlocking your company’s true potential is ensuring your employees understand how their specific job/role contributes to achieving your company’s business objectives. Without a consistent process of setting goals for each individual employee that map directly to your company’s objectives, they may be spending too much time on the wrong activities.

In fact, leading industry analysts estimate nearly 95% of workers are unaware of their company’s top objectives. And, that’s often because an effective process to communicate and track progress against these objectives does not exist. So how can your company expect its people to work toward a shared vision — and deliver bottom-line results — if they’re unclear what’s expected of them?

2. Establish a formal process for creating relevant goals for each employee. Monitoring/measuring performance against company objectives, unquestionably results in both individual and company success. The benefits of this approach deliver a host of positive results.

– Employees and managers achieve more – through greater visibility into both individual and company-wide goals.
Employees and managers see the goal plan – and understand how their individual goals fit into the company’s business objectives.

-Creating shared employee responsibility – by cascading his or her goals with others in the company.
-Managers more easily stay in touch with employees’ progress – during every phase of goal completion, and offer immediate reinforcement or coaching to keep performance and deadlines on track.

Keep in mind your success in aligning employee and company goals depends on an open and ongoing dialogue with management. This is the only way to ensure business strategy is woven in to all HR efforts, including an automated process.

3. Keep employees energized and engaged
In a nutshell, the ultimate goal of managing is not to get an employee to perform as expected, but to have them willingly go above and beyond the call of duty — because they want to.

Building a culture in which employees are energized and engaged to perform at maximum levels (and beyond!) requires both strong management skills and a consistent process for providing accurate, quality feedback. That’s easier said than done, of course. But recent progress in HR-software designed specifically to address this challenge is helping significantly. There are now effective means like writing assistants and coaching tools that can significantly improve the overall quality of feedback, and help managers provide:

More relevant reviews – writing and goal management tools help managers deliver meaningful, accurate reviews so employees understand their performance against goals.
Richer, more meaningful feedback – built-in writing tools ensure consistency between managers, and deliver a deeper level of feedback.
Stronger, more relevant coaching – managers receive specific, actionable suggestions for coaching employees through a range of issues.

Ultimately, quality feedback is what keeps your employee’s head in the game and can be used to inspire and fire them up. It also increases job satisfaction and reduces turnover – two critical factors that most small- to mid-sized businesses say they are concerned with on a daily basis.

Leaders with the most impact are those who can build and successfully manage great teams. Every day, we help our clients and colleagues achieve their highest levels of professional presence and personal effectiveness. That includes everyone on the ladder, from company presidents to project managers, to staff members. Contact us at 800-282-3374 to find out how we can help you impact your own productivity and the productivity of your entire organization.

We deliver results-oriented training programs that increase productivity, effectiveness, & performance. Call 800.282.3374

Posted by & filed under Communicating To Manage Performance, Communication.

Feedback & Positive BehaviorAcquiring effective feedback skills is one of the cornerstones of communicating to manage performance. Specific feedback encourages positive behavior. Not all positive feedback is created equal. Unfortunately generic (wishy washy, “nice job”) positive feedback can have reducing impact or even disengage employees over time.  In addition generic positive feedback is often accompanied by specific detailed criticism “You wave your hands around when you present, which is very distracting.” We need to be as specific with what was good and what worked, as well as with areas to be improved.

For feedback to encourage positive behavior it needs to be specific and clear. “You did a great job with your presentation. Your message ‘Be the change’ was clear and memorable. I particularly enjoyed the story about how you were inspired to change by the action of your boss, and how you have since applied the lesson; that really resonated with me.”

Positive performance feedback works best when it is specific and used in tandem with one or two areas to improve, with suggestions clearly demonstrated. The balance should always be more specific positives than suggestions for improvement, encouraging the behavior we want repeated.

Unbalanced positive performance feedback can give people false confidence beyond their actual skill, or performance, levels. Positive reinforcement can be powerful, but to be effective it also needs to be specific and clear.

Consider these examples:
“Good job. Keep it up.”  OR
“Your report was well written, your thoughts logical and your conclusions were on target. Your computer analogy effectively made your point about the outcome being only as good as the inputs. ”

The first comment may make the listener feel good, but leave them in the dark about why it was good. It might make them feel you didn’t notice what they did, that the compliment was automatic, rather than sincere. The second comment is specific and positive, it tells the listener what you valued, and clearly shows you paid attention. Additionally the second clearly shows which behavior to repeat.

Feedback for high Performance?
The problem is we often don’t feel comfortable giving or receiving feedback due to lack of skill, experience or an effective, supportive process. We have institutionalized the giving and receiving of Performance feedback, making it something we do by rote. We tend to save our praise and comments for the reviews instead of giving them in the moment, while the concept is still fresh in our minds. Once, or twice, a year we deliver a pile of “stale constructive criticism” to each employee and are surprised by the negative responses. No wonder the process becomes unnerving and fear provoking.

Giving and receiving Performance feedback is potentially some of the most important communication we can engage in with the members of our team. Team members need to know what they are doing well, and areas (with suggestions) where they can improve. Time needs to be made to involve them in the solutions, and to hear their feedback too. Team members need to see and experience, through our actions, that feedback is welcomed. For them to really hear, and take action on suggestions, feedback needs to be delivered in both directions, carefully and frequently.

Make Feedback easier:
Train leaders (and team members) on how to deliver effective, constructive feedback. Create a culture of open, growth mindset, supportive feedback through demonstrated action. Our teams follow our examples, not necessarily what we say they should do.

An effective process and practice, helps us avoid the uncomfortable feeling we all get when critiquing others.
Giving feedback effectively is a skill that takes practice to build competence and confidence. Without a tried, tested process, which is effectively trained and integrated into your organization’s culture, your employees will tend to avoid these potentially awkward, or confrontational discussions. This is a very human issue and one that is easily overcome with the right training and repeated practice.

Leaders with the most impact are those who can build and successfully manage great teams. Every day, we help our clients and colleagues achieve their highest levels of professional presence and personal effectiveness. That includes everyone on the ladder, from company presidents to project managers, to staff members. Contact us at 800-282-3374 to find out how we can help you impact your own productivity and the productivity of your entire organization.

We deliver results-oriented training programs that increase productivity, effectiveness, & performance. Call 800.282.3374

Posted by & filed under Employee Development, increasing personal effectiveness, Performance Management, Personal Effectiveness.

How To Change Workplace BehaviorWe invest our time and money in a learning event only to find that when we return to our daily work, we keep doing the same things.

It all sounds so good, and you are so excited to put the new methods and tools you have learned into practice, but when you get back to the workplace, the boss is still asking the same questions and expecting the same results. The processes in your workplace could also be different than those described in the class, causing you to struggle with how to apply what you have learned in your environment.

Learning is not an event – it’s a process! The classroom is important, but the fact is that most learning takes place when we apply the tools and techniques we discovered in the learning event. Learning is a process of alignment, assimilation and application. Only by completing all three steps of this process can we change behavior to produce desired results.

Align – Before participating in a learning event, participants should have a thorough understanding of what they are expected to learn, how their behavior is expected to change, the results they are expected to achieve and how these results contribute to the overall goals of the organization. When this step is skipped, participants attend the learning event and are left entirely on their own to determine what they are supposed to do with what they learn. This often leads to a disconnect between participants and their leaders when they return to the workplace.

For example, when you attend a leadership program with a dozen learning objectives, you discover some new tools for gaining group consensus. You know this is something you can apply right away to make some decisions in your work team. Returning to work, you share your ideas with your manager only to find that what your manager really wanted you to learn was how to facilitate the creation of a team vision. This was covered in the class, but not knowing this was why you had been selected to attend the class, you focused your attention on what you perceived to be an important skill.

Assimilate – During the learning event, you focus on assimilating the learning that resonates with you. An effective learning event will engage you in applying what you already know in building relevant skills and knowledge that you decide to focus on and practice in the class. If these vital elements of an effective learning event are part of the assimilation, then you will return to work prepared to apply what you have learned. If not, then you may have an awareness of and even a desire to apply these tools but no practical experience in how to do it.

Whether assimilation happens effectively largely depends on who is leading your learning event. At EDSI, our instructors are a content resource who help you establish new processes and expectations of employees in your organization. The net result? Higher productivity and profits.

Apply – Applying what you have learned is where 80 percent of the learning takes place. Using the skills and knowledge within your work environment that makes the learning stick, causing a behavior change that produces desired results. In this step, it is important that you experience early success. This early success depends on leadership support and coaching. Left on your own, you are likely to discover unique factors in your work environment that make it difficult to apply what you have learned. The system and often the people resist change.

Because learning is changing behavior, you will encounter resistance. You will need someone supporting you with encouragement, coaching and running interference as you attempt to adapt your behavior.

Leaders with the most impact are those who can build and successfully manage great teams. Every day, we help our clients and colleagues achieve their highest levels of professional presence and personal effectiveness. That includes everyone on the ladder, from company presidents to project managers, to staff members. Contact us at 800-282-3374 to find out how we can help you impact your own productivity and the productivity of your entire organization.

We deliver results-oriented training programs that increase productivity, effectiveness, & performance. Call 800.282.3374

Posted by & filed under Accountability, Communicating To Manage Performance, Employee Development, increasing personal effectiveness, Leadership, Performance Management, Personal Effectiveness.

Some believe that planning is dead! They say that today’s environment changes too often and too quickly. Despite the disruptive and incessant pace of change, planning is still an important function in the workplace. A good plan provides a framework for organizing company resources and it provides direction for employees on how they can help the company fulfill its strategic goals.The key difference in planning today is how this function is viewed and implemented.  Effective planning is less rigid now than it was in the past. Many leaders neglect the planning function, and here’s why:

1. They dislike constraints of any kind. It is important for managers to keep options open to encourage creativity and innovation. Taken to an extreme, however, the lack of any sensible constraints creates confusion. Employees are unsure of the strategic direction of the company as they are constantly switched from one project to another. They eventually become frustrated and organizational productivity declines.

2. They assume that “crisis mode” is inevitable. There’s an element of truth to this view particularly as the scope of a manager’s job increases. Unrelenting crisis management is often a sign of insufficient planning, however.

3. They have been successful in the past without any real planning. This success becomes harder to repeat as a manager’s responsibilities increase. Planning is a critical function for middle and senior level managers as they execute organizational initiatives through others.

4. They have not been adequately trained in how to plan. Have you invested enough in your managers’ professional development to ensure that they really know how to create and execute plans? A good plan defines what needs to be done and how it is to be done. Senior managers develop strategic plans that apply to the entire organization. Middle and front line managers develop operational plans to implement the strategic plans. There are many tools used in planning including SWOT Analysis, vision and mission statements, environmental scanning, resource analysis, etc. Since many managers are promoted for their technical ability with no real training in management, this is another area where managers can take a management seminar from a reputable company to learn how to plan effectively.

5. They lack self-discipline. Successful managers increase self-awareness of their own shortcomings, identify realistic goals for themselves, and commit to meeting their goals. They keep practicing self-discipline until it becomes routine for them. Are you one of those managers? If not, consider how you can increase your own personal effectiveness by recognizing areas where you need to improve.

6. Some managers are solely focused on results. For these “get-it-done and get-it-done quickly” managers, there is a need to be effective as well as efficient. Getting things done does not always mean that the right things are being done. Well designed plans address what needs to be done in the organization (effectiveness) as well as how it is to be done (efficiency).

Despite what some may say, planning is not dead! Plans today must be living documents that adapt to changing market needs. To plan effectively, managers develop relevant plans and then adapt them as necessary to the ever-changing business landscape. No matter the reason, the familiar management saying still holds true: If you fail to plan, plan to fail!

 

Leaders with the most impact are those who can build and successfully manage great teams. Every day, we help our clients and colleagues achieve their highest levels of professional presence and personal effectiveness. That includes everyone on the ladder, from company presidents to project managers, to staff members. Contact us at 800-282-3374 to find out how we can help you impact your own productivity and the productivity of your entire organization.

We deliver results-oriented training programs that increase productivity, effectiveness, & performance. Call 800.282.3374

Posted by & filed under Communicating To Manage Performance, Employee Development, increasing personal effectiveness.

“The most powerful force in the universe is compound interest.” – Albert Einstein

EDSI_IownthisCommunicating to Manage Performance & taking ownership of your behavior are key strengths in developing and cultivating a culture of continuous improvement. Inspiring each and every employee – specifically those closest to the front line – to find ways to increase effectiveness, remove waste, and increase efficiency creates the organizational equivalent of compound interest. Over time, the payoffs can be tremendous.

Creating a culture of continuous improvement, or any other proactive culture, starts with clearly understanding what makes a proactive culture unique. The fundamental difference between a reactive culture and a proactive one is that a proactive culture empowers front-line workers to make local decisions, take action and then take ownership of the results – something normally associated with supervisors. For an organization not accustomed to this, this is big deal change! In a reactive culture, ownership of behavior is informally assigned to supervisors and/or the appropriate organizational department.

In a proactive culture the desired behaviors are supported and reinforced by everyone. The answer to who owns safety (or customer service or reliability) is ‘Everyone.’ You don’t get very far without your hardhat (or safety glasses or hearing protection) in a proactive safety environment – everyone is looking out for you. In a culture of continuous improvement, the same attitude prevails regarding waste, errors, and problem identification. Everyone is involved in the process and the focus is typically less on being the best and more on being better. It is in the process of getting better that they become the best.
Leadership should focus on three primary goals to create a culture of continuous improvement:

Creating a clear expectation of the desired organizational behavior. This includes the behaviors of the leadership, management, supervisors, and workers. Organizational culture is influenced by systems, structures and style of leadership. By knowing what behaviors are expected, the leadership can then align the systems and structures to support and reinforce those behaviors.

Clearly communicating through action that the front line worker is the critical factor in success.
Focusing on ‘Why’, not ‘Who’. Some managers use the 5 Why’s technique of root cause analysis to identify the source of any problem – and then eliminate the problem at the source. The front line workers become actively engaged in identifying the problem and then developing the solution. This intellectual engagement creates the sense of ownership and commitment that is at the heart of true continuous improvement.

If all you give is orders, all you get is order takers. Creating a culture of continuous improvement requires that the leaders lead differently and replace a culture of compliance with a culture of commitment. By reinforcing critical behaviors, empowering the workers, and focusing on why, not who, your organization can tap into ‘…the most powerful force in the universe.’

Leaders with the most impact are those who can build and successfully manage great teams. Every day, we help our clients and colleagues achieve their highest levels of professional presence and personal effectiveness. That includes everyone on the ladder, from company presidents to project managers, to staff members. Contact us at 800-282-3374 to find out how we can help you impact your own productivity and the productivity of your entire organization.

We deliver results-oriented training programs that increase productivity, effectiveness, & performance. Call 800.282.3374

Posted by & filed under Active Listening, Actively Engaged Workers, career development leadership development, increasing personal effectiveness, Performance Management, Personal Effectiveness, Professional Presence in a Casual World.

Increase Personal Effectiveness with Your Own BrandIf you thought of yourself as a product, what would your brand be? What kind of slogan or mission would your “product” embrace and what do you think other people would say your brand is? Use whatever gift you have received to serve others (financial advisor, accountant, software engineer, etc.). Be grateful for customers, they are how you feed your family. Try gratitude as your brand. If you think of your work as a form of service, you’ll find that your attitude becomes more positive and your productivity will go up!

Let your brand be gratitude, so regardless of what is in your pocket, no one will know the difference from an up day or a down day.
Honest feedback is a gift. Seek it out and embrace it as a learning opportunity. Try not to be defensive.
Seek out mentorship. Make sure to position yourself around people who can help you grow, as well as, be open and willing to help others.
Forgiveness is such an asset in business. There will be people who will try to use you, trick you or get over with a better deal than they deserve. Have a short memory when it comes to those who have wronged you.
Be thankful for the good days and bad days, because bad days are just learning opportunities that help us appreciate good days.
Be known for great leadership and service to your customers, but also to your employees and vendors.  If you make it about serving them, they will do all they can to serve the best interest of your business. You understand your people when they know you understand them. It’s all about helping people succeed professionally/individually within the scope of their role, serving those you are responsible for, for those you are responsible to.

Servant leadership must support the vision over all. Leaders should show up each day with enthusiasm for their own job, and be ready and willing to inspire others. Hold true to your leadership style, the top serves employees who serve customers – to be first you must be last.

Make time to encourage others. Sometimes we all get busy, but don’t ever be too busy to share a moment to inspire, mentor or be a sounding board for another. It’s a heavy burden we carry as business professionals, and we all need to remember we are not alone.

  • Take on the blame, even when it is not yours to own
  • Better to be respected than liked
  • Step in without being asked
  • Answer the question that has not been asked
  • Know when to level-set the over-whelming positive out pour, sometimes middle of the road emotions are all that’s needed
  • Show you think of others
  • Recognize your own poor behavior and take responsibility

“Good, strong business leaders can exert more influence than they realize on those with whom they work and, therefore, on the service component in our country. What does it mean for a leader to serve colleagues, peers and others? Let’s look at six ways one can do that.

LEAD: One leads, first of all, by the example of hard work. Respect others and honor their commitment by your own hard work. Don’t ask anyone to work harder than you do. One also leads through knowledge. Demonstrate that you really know your product/service.

TEACH: Instill the special knowledge that you possess into those with whom you work.

PROVIDE: Make resources and support available so everyone can be successful at their job. Nothing demoralizes someone more than being asked to do a job, very much wanting to accomplish it, only to find he/she hasn’t the resources to do so.
INSPIRE: Give those around you the respect and love they deserve as human beings. They may be your superiors, your peers or your subordinates, but they all will flourish on large doses of love and respect.

MENTOR: Counsel those around you. I don’t mean be their therapist, but as one who cares and who can assist them in being successful. Promote them when they deserve it. Sure, they may be transferred away or be hired away, but you will have demonstrated that, as a leader, you have put their best interest ahead of yours or the organizations.

SERVE: When taken together, all these elements provide the framework of service, the kind of leadership you can provide which will, by example, encourage others to join and expand the culture of service throughout our country. Now that you’ve created a culture of service around you need to again set the example by actively serving others.”

In summary, highly motivated employees or individuals produce 40% more. While your motivation needs to come from within, it must be real, sincere!

Leaders with the most impact are those who can build and successfully manage great teams. Every day, we help our clients and colleagues achieve their highest levels of professional presence and personal effectiveness. That includes everyone on the ladder, from company presidents to project managers, to staff members. Contact us at 800-282-3374 to find out how we can help you impact your own productivity and the productivity of your entire organization.

We deliver results-oriented training programs that increase productivity, effectiveness, & performance. Call 800.282.3374

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reference: Huffington Post: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ron-mirenda/leaders-lead-by-serving-d_b_232726.html

Posted by & filed under Generational, Hiring & Selection.

Generation Z Coming Into The WorkforceGeneration “Z” also known as the Click Generation, Generation Net, Digital Natives – The youngest of the “5G Workplace,” Generation Z, is just coming into the workforce. It’s premature to report on the impact of this generation, but we can expect these future leaders to bring their own attitudes and expectations to work, just like the generation before them. Generation Z members were surveyed in April 2013 to learn more about their expectations for their future work and identified some interesting trends. Soon they will be entering the professional workforce, ready to start their careers.

According to the research, 60 percent of Generation Z said that having an impact on the world would be more important than their jobs, indicating that organizations may be placing an even higher premium on corporate social responsibility in the future. Generation Z experienced the “Great Recession” and, in some cases, witnessed the impact of long-term unemployment on parents and relatives. They have also seen the cost of higher education rising, along with an explosion in student loan debt. As a result, Gen Z may place more value in work experience over education. A survey in 2010 found that 71 percent of millennial teens said getting an advanced degree was a life goal. By comparison, in 2013, only 64 percent of Generation Z agreed with that statement.

Research also suggests that Generation Z is even more technologically “plugged-in” than Millennials. One survey found that Generation Z has the highest level of technological connectivity, with many spending virtually all of their waking hours connected to a computer, tablet, smart phone, or other electronic device. Like the Millennial generation before them, this will affect their preferences and work styles – including how they communicate, how they gather information and learn, and how they work with others.

Today’s workforce is decidedly multi-generational. It is made up of five generations—Traditionalists, Baby Boomers, Generation X, Generation Y (or Millennials), and a smattering of Generation Z—whose life experiences have left indelible marks on their values and work preferences. This rapid and unprecedented demographic shift has many business leaders wondering how organizations will adapt to the “5G” workplace. Understanding the different generations and what motivates them, can help you develop strategies to attract, develop, and retain leaders in ways that are more relevant. The key to managing the 5G workforce is to appreciate the differences and focus on what they have in common.

Leaders with the most impact are those who can build and successfully manage great teams. Every day, we help our clients and colleagues achieve their highest levels of professional presence and personal effectiveness. That includes everyone on the ladder, from company presidents to project managers, to staff members. Contact us at 800-282-3374 to find out how we can help you impact your own productivity and the productivity of your entire organization.

We deliver results-oriented training programs that increase productivity, effectiveness, & performance. Call 800.282.3374