Posted by & filed under Active Listening, Actively Engaged Workers.

Master This Skill to Improve Communication TodayAs bureaucracies are flattened and autonomy and decision-making are pushed further and further down into the organization, listening becomes, not just important, but vital.

Listening or Hearing, the Importance of Listening – “Are you listening to me?” This question is often asked because the speaker thinks the listener is nodding off or daydreaming. We sometimes think that listening means we only have to sit back, stay barely awake, and let a speaker’s words wash over us. While many managers look upon being active as something to admire, to engage in, and to excel at, listening is often understood as a “passive” activity. In reality: You can’t go wrong by showing interest in what other people say and making them feel important. In other words, the better you listen, the more you’ll be listened to. In the words of business leader and author, Stephen Covey, Listen First to Understand. We believe so strongly in this statement that we developed a course around it, and it’s one of our most impactful programs. Learn more here.

You may have heard the adage, “We have two ears but only one mouth”—an easy way to remember that listening can be twice as important as talking. In business you may spend many hours in meetings doing a large amount of focused listening, yet sometimes it is difficult to apply those efforts to communication in other areas of the enterprise. As a result your listening skills may not be all they could be.

Hearing is an accidental and automatic brain response to sound that requires no effort. We are surrounded by sounds most of the time. For example, we are accustomed to the sounds of airplanes, lawn mowers, furnace blowers, the rattling of pots and pans, and so on. We hear those incidental sounds and, unless we have a reason to do otherwise, we train ourselves to ignore them. We learn to filter out sounds that mean little to us, just as we choose to hear our ringing cell phones and other sounds that are more important to us.

Listening, on the other hand, is purposeful and focused rather than accidental. As a result, it requires motivation and effort. Listening, at its best, is active, focused, concentrated attention for the purpose of understanding the meanings expressed by a speaker. We do not always listen at our best however, and in a future article we will examine some of the reasons why and some strategies for becoming more active critical listeners.

Steps to Effective Listening

  • Gather information to participate in the decision-making process. A lot of this information is received verbally from others—managers, coworkers, customers, or suppliers.
  • Serve as a resource to others. Getting others to cooperate involves more than just telling them what is required. It involves hearing others’ suggestions and explanations as well.
  • Analyze problems and evaluate results. Most people need input from others to do this most effectively.
  • Understand the diversities of those whom they manage, direct, or support.

In our Listen First to Understand program, participants learn to demonstrate listening in order to receive information accurately, defuse emotionally-charged situations, and respond non-defensively in the face of disagreement. Learn more!

Leaders with the most impact are those who can build and successfully manage great teams. Every day, we help our clients and colleagues achieve their highest levels of professional presence and personal effectiveness. That includes everyone on the ladder, from company presidents to project managers, to staff members. Contact us at 800-282-3374 to find out how we can help you impact your own productivity and the productivity of your entire organization.

We deliver results-oriented training programs that increase productivity, effectiveness, & performance. Call 800.282.3374

 

 

Posted by & filed under Employee Development, Generational, Hiring & Selection.

Do Millennials Want Mentorship At Work?Businesses talk a big game about appealing to young staffers, but they tend to fall down on the most basic of requirements: training them and helping them along in their careers.

Talk to junior staffers, and you’ll frequently hear them say the training they receive is often lackluster, as is the mentorship that many crave and deem essential for progressing in the business. They’re promised both formal and informal opportunities to learn and to develop their skills, but when the rubber hits the road it’s often not a priority for those higher up in their companies.
What’s more, it’s mentorship they value more than formalized training, and that’s often what’s lacking. It’s one thing to sit in a room and be “educated”; it’s another to have consistent feedback and dialogue.

“The biggest complaint I have is focused around mentorship,” one of our recent clients reported, for example. “A lot of managers are spread too thin to set aside proper time to make sure that juniors are learning the basics of their craft.”

Like any millennial story, this one has a paradox. The same group that claims to crave mentorship also reports chafing at being micromanaged. But no matter what, the millennial generation, by all accounts, is ambitious and eager to succeed. The question is whether businesses, which are at risk of a brain drain, are blowing it by not doing enough to nurture the talent they have.
More senior people seem to think that putting employees through a few HR-led classes and giving them an employee handbook qualifies as training. While this may teach new employees the Xs and Os, it isn’t addressing the friction senior leaders are having with Millennials. If you want to get the most out of Millennials — or anyone for that matter — you have to take a personal interest in their growth and development.

The simple fact of the matter is most businesses struggle to find the time and resources to provide the level of support Millennials seek, despite their best intentions. That might have more to do with the financial situations in which they now find themselves in than with the changing expectations of their employees. Businesses continue to see their margins reduced, which means training is often viewed as a cost, as opposed to an opportunity to extract more value from their younger employees.

That could be having a detrimental effect on their businesses if for no other reason than consistency. The quality of service is only as good as the people, and without good training, that provides a consistent foundation of knowledge, skills and the company’s particular methodologies, different clients will have different experiences, some good, many bad.
Whatever the reasons, financial, generational or even cultural, the disconnect continues. The business is tough, but Millennials are looking for more from their employers. It might be an added expense, but the best way for businesses to squeeze more value from their junior employees is, quite simply, just to spend more time guiding them.

Communicating to Manage Performance, Leading With Credibility, and Increasing Professional Presence are all programs that help managers and front-line employees improve the coaching and mentoring relationships in your workplace.

We deliver results-oriented training programs that increase productivity, effectiveness, & performance. Call 800.282.3374

Posted by & filed under Actively Engaged Workers, Employee Development, Generational.

She's always prepared to do businessGeneration Y (Born 1981-2000), is called the Echo generation, a name they acquired because they closely echo their Boomer parents’ attributes and characteristics. The Echo Generation is the result of parents who felt guilty about how they raised their Xer children and were devoted to this generation and its needs, in a real way becoming soccer moms, little-league dads and making sure that their Echo Gen kids enjoyed life. This time around the Boomer parents went all out with swimming lessons, dancing lessons, camp and any other form of activity that would make the Generation Y children happy. As a result, these children led a structured and sheltered life, having great relationships with their parents whom they believe to be cool and more like friends.

This global generation rose out of their diverse activities and exposure to many different kinds of people at an early age, much of it through technology. They can’t comprehend the fact that their parents grew up without the Internet.
Generation Y is worldly and very accepting of differences in people seeing them as an opportunity to learn new things and make new friends. They are the most diverse generation ever born, judging people for who they are rather than their ethnic origins, race, religion or sexual orientation.
Having grown up during a time with a booming economy, doting parents and unprecedented technological advancements, the Y generation tends to exhibit the following characteristics:

  • Inspired and confident
  • Pampered and nurtured
  • Academic
  • Tech savvy – even more so than the X generation
  • Honor and admire their parents
  • Resist traditional categorization by race, religion or sexual orientation
  • View things non-traditionally
  • Multi-taskers and easily bored
  • Worldly

Management typically finds this generation baffling. Compared to the X generation that required very little motivation, were self-starters and didn’t need micro-managing, the Y generation needs structure and clear direction with oversight. As more of this generation enters the workforce, companies might consider new ways to recruit, hire and retain these employees. Orientation programs must transition from lecture to interactive if companies are to keep the Gen Yers’ interest and have any hope that they retain the information necessary to deliver on the organization’s goals. On-the-job training must be specific, detailed and structured, with check-in and follow-up phases built into the training.

Creating an environment that will retain Y-generation employees and ensure that they are motivated to be productive will need leaders to:

  • Explain the “why”
  • Involve them and ask their opinion
  • Treat them and others with respect
  • Make time for orienting them
  • Provide supervision and structure
  • Use a team concept
  • Offer more and quality training
  • Offer mentoring
  • Recognize and reward

Generation Yers have not yet moved into the workforce management ranks as the youngest are in middle school, and the oldest have only recently graduated from college. So while it is not yet known what type of mangers this generation will prove to be, some indications are that they will be more like their Boomer parents, exhibiting a consensual, people-focused style of management.

This year (2015), the “Millennial” Y-Generation (75.3 million) is projected to surpass the outsized Baby Boom generation (74.9 million) as the nation’s largest living generation, according to the population projections released by the U.S. Census Bureau, so let’s prepare to help this generation increase professional presence and overall personal effectiveness!

Leaders with the most impact are those who can build and successfully manage great teams. Every day, we help our clients and colleagues achieve their highest levels of professional presence and personal effectiveness. That includes everyone on the ladder, from company presidents to project managers, to staff members. Contact us at 800-282-3374 to find out how we can help you impact your own productivity and the productivity of your entire organization.

We deliver results-oriented training programs that increase productivity, effectiveness, & performance. Call 800.282.3374

Posted by & filed under Career Development, career development leadership development, Communicating To Manage Performance, Employee Development, Generational.

How to Develop Generation X LeadersThe Generation-Xers (Born 1961-1980), the first born children of the Baby Boomers, are often referred to as latch-key kids because while their parents were working long hours climbing the corporate ladder, the Xers came home and took care of themselves. At approximately 51 million born in the United States, a relatively small generation, this group saw their parents working incredibly long hours with little free time. As a result, the Xers made a choice, and that choice was to work to live. Don’t be misled; the Xers can be driven in their work if what they want requires it.

Who are they?

Three quarters of Gen Xers have children (with an average of 2.5), and most have children living with them now. Almost 20% have blended families that include a child from a previous relationship.
Two in five are working in the career they intended when they entered the workforce. Almost a quarter have been with the same employer for 15 years or longer.

The average age a Gen Xer is planning to start collecting Social Security is 65. However, when given information about the age at which they can collect full benefits, the average age increased to 66.
The largest percentage (41%) of Gen Xers identifies more with Generation X than with Baby Boomers or Generation Y, but a significant portion (28%) identify with Boomers.

The Misinterpreted Generation

One of the biggest misrepresentations is that the X generation is lazy and does not want to work, a perspective most often held by Boomer or Traditionalist bosses, and this could not be more wrong. Xers just see work differently. They see it as a means to end, not their life. They’re willing to work hard but would prefer that the work happen on their terms.
The X generation grew up during more uncertain times. They are the generation that graduated from college and were not able to find a job in their field. They are the children of a 60-percent divorce rate, so they often were raised by one parent or shuffled between parents. They are the first generation of children to experience terrorism on our soil.
This generation tends to exhibit the following characteristics, as a result of learning to take care of themselves at an early age:

  • Skeptical and Edgy
  • Change masters
  • Tech savvy
  • Self-reliant, not impressed by authority
  • Private/keep their own counsel
  • Have a non-traditional sense of time
  • Are non-conformists and not impressed by authority

Developing the Generation X Leader

As leaders, they tend to be fair, straightforward and competent. Their communication style is open and honest, and they tend to “tell it like it is.” Challenges for the Generation Xers as leaders are that they can be more focused on the task rather than the people. They do not necessarily build relationships easily, and their communication style tends to be brutally honest.

Here’s how to help the Generation X emerging leaders in your organization:

  • Assist them in focusing on building relationships.
  • Teach the Xers core soft skills, such as coaching, communication, professional presence, personal effectiveness, and communicating to manage others. These skills will compliment their technical and operational skills.
  • Help them develop people-oriented communication skills.
  • Explain the “why” behind policies and procedures.
  • Be frank and honest in your communications with them.

Leaders with the most impact are those who can build and successfully manage great teams. Every day, we help our clients and colleagues achieve their highest levels of professional presence and personal effectiveness. That includes everyone on the ladder, from company presidents to project managers, to staff members. Contact us at 800-282-3374 to find out how we can help you impact your own productivity and the productivity of your entire organization.

We deliver results-oriented training programs that increase productivity, effectiveness, & performance. Call 800.282.3374

 

Posted by & filed under Generational, increasing personal effectiveness, Performance Management, Personal Effectiveness, Professional Presence in a Casual World.

How To Succeed With A Traditionalist Culture In The WorkplaceMany traditionalists are staying in the job market for longer than ever before. They may be 75 years old and are working with people 1/3 their age. Whether you are a traditionalist or you work with one, many of today’s biggest companies are based on the values of the “Traditionalist” generation. Traditionalists (born on or before 1942) are the keepers of the workplace Holy Grail of history and a pain to the more action-oriented boomers and tech-savvy Xers. Today less than 5 percent are active in the workplace, yet they are still solid, no-nonsense performers who tend to exhibit the following characteristics:

  • True American values
  • Civic pride
  • Loyalty and dependability
  • Respect for authority
  • Disciplined (value obedience over individualism)
  • Believe in the concept of law and order
  • Live by the adage, “An honest day’s pay for an honest day’s work.”
  • Oriented to the past (may say things like, “In my day …”)
  • Conformers
  • Logical

Does Your Company Have a Traditionalist Culture?  Traditionalists grew up in an era where manufacturing offered consistency in processes as well as guaranteed income. Many of this generation abandoned farms that had dried up during the great Dust Bowl of the 1930s and went to work in the factories in the cities. When the country called for service during World War II, they served with pride and without hesitation. This generation lived through the Great Depression and the Dust Bowl, learning self-discipline to survive. They did not live beyond their means and learned to work hard to take care of their families.

In general, the Traditionalist believes in doing what is right. Decisions and actions should be logical and justifiable. They are disciplined and dislike disorganization. They often resist change and need all of the information to make a decision or to be convinced to change. Does this sound like your company? They do not take their job or employment for granted, and they have a strong sense of responsibility to family and the job.

The Traditionalist-based organization tends to foster a directive, command-and-control leadership style. Traditionalist-based companies will have more difficulty fostering high performance from an employee in a younger generation who can’t relate to those fundamentally “Traditionalist” values.

Advice for Traditionalist Leaders As executives, Traditionalists expect that they will be followed without question, as they did when they were employees. They did not question the boss, and they expect their decisions will be received and honored without question in the same way. They often exhibit traits of the “Type A” manager with a “My way or the highway” personality and, as you can imagine, this management style does not sit well with the younger employees, especially generations X and Y.
You can assist the Traditionalist leader by:

  • Being patient but firm
  • Clearly and coherently explaining the rules or parameters of the company culture
  • Supporting them in developing their people skills
  • Encouraging and assisting them with change
  • Being efficient in providing information in a timely manner
  • Respecting and valuing their life and work experience
  • Holding all employees accountable for performance and behavior

Leaders with the most impact are those who can build and successfully manage great teams. Every day, we help our clients and colleagues achieve their highest levels of professional presence and personal effectiveness. That includes everyone on the ladder, from company presidents to project managers, to staff members. Contact us at 800-282-3374 to find out how we can help you impact your own productivity and the productivity of your entire organization.

We deliver results-oriented training programs that increase productivity, effectiveness, & performance. Call 800.282.3374.

Posted by & filed under Change Management, increasing personal effectiveness, Time management.

How Successful People Find More Time In The DaySuccessful people tend to follow an early morning routine. Using the early morning time to get ahead on your personal and career goals will instantly give you an extra 2 hours per day that most people spend sleeping or mindlessly drinking coffee while watching television. Once your day gets rolling, you are working down your energy level, just like gas in your car, so it’s important to consciously choose a time management system that serves your needs and makes the most of your energy,  to ensure an effective day. Does your current system include these components?

  • Creating an environment conducive to effectiveness
  • Setting of priorities
  • Carrying out activity around those priorities
  • The related process of reduction of time spent on non-priorities
  • Incentives to modify behavior to ensure compliance with time-related deadlines

It’s Not Just for Work!

One of the key factors found in successful time management is learning to use it  throughout your life, not just at work. Over time, the efficiencies you integrate into your professional life will root themselves deeply into your nature, and become part of  how you live your life, no matter where you are!

As time management evolved there have been some specific methodologies developed out of its core nature; such as ABC Analysis, Pareto Analysis, The Eisenhower Method, and POSEC Method. Which of these methods will work best for you?

ABC Analysis
This process is the categorization of large data into groups. These groups are often marked A, B, and C—hence the name. Activities are ranked by these general criteria:
A – Tasks that are identified as being urgent and important,
B – Important but not urgent tasks,
C – Neither urgent nor important tasks. (This list could also include tasks that are urgent but not important.)

Pareto Analysis
The old 80% / 20% rule. Basically the majority of most important or 80% of tasks take up 20% of time, while the remaining 20% of tasks will take up 80% of the time. This principle is used to sort tasks into two parts. According to this form of Pareto analysis, it is recommended that tasks that fall into the first category be assigned a higher priority.
The “Eisenhower Method” stems from a quote attributed to Dwight D. Eisenhower: “I have two kinds of problems, the urgent and the important. The urgent are not important, and the important are never urgent.”

POSEC Method
POSEC is an acronym for Prioritize by Organizing, Streamlining, Economizing and Contributing.
The POSEC Hierarchy:
Prioritize – Your time and define your life by goals.
Organize – Things you have to accomplish regularly to be successful (family and finances).
Streamline – Things you may not like to do, but must do (work and chores).
Economize – Things you should do or may even like to do, but they’re not pressingly urgent (pastimes and socializing).
Contribute – By paying attention to the few remaining things that make a difference (social obligations).

Research has defined for us many methods and tools to facilitate effective time management.  We can use one or many of them or even a combination or multiple tools. The key is to actively engage ourselves and our lives in the practice of looking at tasks and to do’s throughout our day so you can categorize each task into useful groupings. Live consciously.

Whichever tool or combination of tools you use, the key to your success is to use whatever tool works best for you. Use them every day, until those new habits become second nature. Finally establishing a set of time management habits will result in increased personal effectiveness and improved personal presence!

Leaders with the most impact are those who can build and successfully manage great teams. Every day, we help our clients and colleagues achieve their highest levels of professional presence and personal effectiveness. That includes everyone on the ladder, from company presidents to project managers, to staff members. Contact us at 800-282-3374 to find out how we can help you impact your own productivity and the productivity of your entire organization.

We deliver results-oriented training programs that increase productivity, effectiveness, & performance. Call 800.282.3374.

Posted by & filed under Employee Development, Generational, Performance Management.

Make Your Generation Mix a Business AssetWe’ve never had a workplace with so much generational diversity before. For most of the last century, people moved through their career in a linear fashion, with important milestones largely marked by time or seniority. Retirement age used to be 65, and that was it. But today’s workforce looks and feels different. As a leader, this means you have a more dynamic group of people working for you than ever before, and you need to lead with credibility.

There are many explanations for the current demographics ranging from improved health and longevity to the financial market meltdown of 2008 which forced many people (a large number of Baby Boomers) to postpone retirement for financial reasons. We can’t control why so many generations are working side-by-side. So – we have no choice but to find ways for people with very different life experiences based upon age to work well together. So, how do business leaders keep the peace in the multi-generational workforce?

We have to design, build and deliver employee training that meets the needs of a very diverse workforce. As we start thinking carefully about the various generations, it’s important to understand that the differences between them are not simply a matter of age. Each generation has been shaped by events, and it’s the events during the formative years for people that make the most lasting and important impressions.

These “formative” or “sign post” events help inform attitudes about everything from politics, home, entertainment, to work or careers. It’s also important to bear in mind that making sweeping generalizations about large groups of people is not an accurate predictor of personality, traits, character, skills, motivations, etc.

The generational differences we’re going to explore that impact our employee training efforts tell some of each person’s story, but in the end, everyone is unique and may or may not fit neatly into the broad categories or characterizations usually associated with their generation.

Benefits of Understanding the Differences
Stereotyping generations can be very limiting. If we take the time to understand our employees and generational influences we can benefit from:

  • More effective communication
  • Increased engagement
  • Improved employee retention
  • Motivated employees
  • Increased productivity and teamwork

All of these benefits lead to increased productivity, workplace success and ultimately a stronger business!

The formative life events of each generation help frame a world view that people bring to their jobs every day. This broad-based world view impacts work styles, our attitudes towards change and toward our careers, and how we structure our work and life!
As a leader, learning how generational differences impact each of your team members will help you align your communications to make them more effective in every way! This valuable information will help you design training goals and practices, understand their learning styles, how they can best communicate, problem solve, and make decisions. Getting an inside view of each team member’s generational influences will help you tailor your feedback so it is most likely to be met in a positive way.

Leaders with the most impact are those who can build and successfully manage great teams. Every day, we help our clients and colleagues achieve their highest levels of professional presence and personal effectiveness. That includes everyone on the ladder, from company presidents to project managers, to staff members. Contact us at 800-282-3374 to find out how we can help you impact your own productivity and the productivity of your entire organization.

We deliver results-oriented training programs that increase productivity, effectiveness, & performance. Call 800.282.3374.

 

Posted by & filed under Employee Development, Performance Management, Personal Effectiveness.

Has your team’s moral taken a dive? It’s time to rely on this proven performance management framework to get your team back on track.Improve Workplace Morale Through Performance Management

1) Investigate – What’s really happening within the team? Is one member undermining the group? Or maybe the current challenges being faced by your company are distracting people from their jobs and causing a slump in mortality.
It’s typically related to performance – of either the entire team or of an individual. The reason may be that the wrong objectives have been established. It’s likely your team members feel their objectives are not doable or not practical. Performance management will help you to review these targets.

2) Execute – Performance management works best when there is an atmosphere of honesty and openness. It’s important to encourage this in your people. Workable, understandable objectives also need to be set. Ensure they are SMARTER (specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, time-bound, evaluated and re-evaluated). This useful mnemonic was developed from George T. Doran’s comments in Management Review and has been in use ever since. Help your team to understand how they can achieve their targets. They shouldn’t leave the preventive maintenance program until they understand the steps they should take to improve their work.

3) Give clear and ongoing feedback – Many managers, directors and even CEOs avoid providing feedback, likely because they see it as criticism. However, this really is not true. Everyone can benefit from being told in which areas they need to improve and which steps they should take to go about it. When giving feedback, it’s helpful to categorize it as “feedback,” making your intention of offering support evident.

4) Establish Goals – Make sure that all targets are clearly aligned to your company’s objectives. It should be clear to your team that their goals are closely aligned to the organizational goals. Make sure you repeatedly revisit this conversation, building a sense of purpose to the (sometimes) difficult days when your team is pushing through a tough project.

5) Praise! – When objectives are met, be sure to praise, reward and promote. Your team members must see that you, too, have an eye on their targets. The promise of promotion is a real motivator.

Dissatisfied teams can be extremely harmful to any business. When people perform poorly or in a negative atmosphere, no output, no matter how successful, will be maintainable. These performance management basics can tackle the problem head on. Individuals, teams and the company will benefit from a more positive working environment, which can only improve results. Who wouldn’t want that?

Leaders with the most impact are those who can build and successfully manage great teams. Every day, we help our clients and colleagues achieve their highest levels of professional presence and personal effectiveness. That includes everyone on the ladder, from company presidents to project managers, to staff members. Contact us at 800-282-3374 to find out how we can help you impact your own productivity and the productivity of your entire organization.

We deliver results-oriented training programs that increase productivity, effectiveness, & performance. Call 800.282.3374.

 

Posted by & filed under career development leadership development, Communication, Conflict Resolution.

When we talk about styles of just about anything, inevitably the discussion will follow with a list and communication isn’t immune from that. It is interesting and more than likely a trait of someone’s ‘communication style’, that you find many different variations of styles, depending on where you research you may find four or five communication styles – possibly more/less.
Fostering Assertive Employees & Increasing Effectiveness
5 Communication Styles -Which one are you?

  • Assertive
  • Aggressive
  • Passive-aggressive
  • Submissive
  • Manipulative

Being an Assertive Communicator is truly where we all want to strive to be, it is healthy and mature manner of communication. Being certain but respectful, not being intimidated.

“Assertiveness is not a quality employees acquire by simply being told that they have more authority or that they should be assertive. It is a quality acquired through a change in mental attitude about oneself and about being assertive. Aggressive Communication is exactly as it sounds, and brings with it some issues of anger, or feeling a certain threat from others that we need to be pretty much in the offense with our communication. Not ideal at all, although some will argue that there are times when this style is extremely necessary and beneficial. Those who have been unsuccessful as an Assertive Communicator might agree, but experience will always side with Assertive Communication as the most healthy and most leaders personal goal at all times as their communication style; whether professionally or personally.” ~Suzanne Updegraff, President, Employee Development Systems, Inc.

The other styles are less common as stand-alone styles, they are usually seen as a shared trait; for example, one might be an Assertive-Submissive or Assertive-Aggressive; taking on the top characteristics of each style.

The key to becoming an effective communicator lies in the understanding of each of the styles as well as understanding ones-self. Taking deep reflection at why we react to things in certain ways, how we think about others as well as ourselves, all play a hand in helping us to pin point our communications style, and knowing it helps us to become highly-effective in using it and our selective communication choices in a manner that can makes us accessible to others in either a transparent way or perhaps the opposite.

Make communication one of your key personal and professional goals this year as a leader or as a person, to learn as much as you can about the style that reflects you the best and learn what buttons others push that can cause you to lose track of that style focus or cause you to slip into other perhaps less desirable styles. The more you know about your own traits the better a communicator you can be, and the more transparent you can become; thus leading your team, flock or others to the end in sight.

The EDSI Assertive Communication program helps employees change their thoughts and behaviors in order to take initiative, offer suggestions, solve problems, and in general communicate more effectively. In this program, participants learn to:

  • Understand behaviors and results of assertive, nonassertive, and aggressive communication
  • Identify self-limiting thoughts and counter those thoughts to facilitate assertive behavior
  • Communicate feedback or preferences clearly and openly
  • Use assertive “I-statements” to keep communication open and avoid defensiveness
  • Use empathic/assertive statements to demonstrate listening
  • Follow a 3-step model to request a change in another’s behavior

Participants learn to foster employee involvement in problem-solving; develop a habit of being proactive, communicate effectively with coworkers, managers, and customers; develop and improve cost-effective organizational processes; and identifying self-limiting thoughts and counter those thoughts to facilitate assertive behavior.

Leaders with the most impact are those who can build and successfully manage great teams. Every day, we help our clients and colleagues achieve their highest levels of professional presence and personal effectiveness. That includes everyone on the ladder, from company presidents to project managers, to staff members. Contact us at 800-282-3374 to find out how we can help you impact your own productivity and the productivity of your entire organization.

We deliver results-oriented training programs that increase productivity, effectiveness, & performance. Call 800.282.3374.